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FoodieKid Offers Healthy, Convenient, Flash-Frozen Baby Food

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FoodieKid’s Simple Starters are flash-frozen, organic baby meals that the New York-based company says take the hassle out of making baby food at home. Developed by Christine Topalian, a Brooklyn-based working mother of two who wanted to make it easier for parents to prepare healthy, natural baby food at home, Simple Starters are convenient packets of flash-frozen ingredients that parents steam and customize to their desired texture, from puree to diced finger-food.

“Demands have never been greater on parents than they are today, and while they are juggling more than ever before, many parents still want to make organic homemade baby food for their little ones, Topalian said.

FoodieKid says Simple Starters offers convenience without compromising on nutrition or taste. The products feature blends that are veggie-forward, without any additives or sweeteners including fruits. The product line includes the Root Veggie and Squash Pack (for babies first starting out on solids featuring veggies with high levels of folate and Vitamin A), the Veggie Blends Pack (a blend of veggies, rich in calcium and fiber to stimulate growth of healthy bacteria) and the Lentil and Veggies Blend Pack (a source of plant-based protein along with iron-rich veggies and Vitamin C to boost iron absorption). All USDA-certified organic ingredients are peeled, chopped, portioned and ready to cook.

FoodieKid also announced its Donate-A-Bag program to help address family food insecurity in New York City. It allows customers to add a bag of Simple Starters to their cart at checkout to be donated to a local food rescue program.

“With the help of our customers, we want to make sure every baby in New York has access to healthy organic food,” Topalian said.

FoodieKid Simple Starters are available in select grocery stores throughout the New York metro area and on FreshDirect, which delivers to New Jersey, Connecticut, Delaware, Pennsylvania and Washington D.C.

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