Type to search

Manufacturing Industry Updates

Free App Helps Employers Implement Safety Best Practices

Share

Andonix’s ‘Safely Pass’ helps firms adjust to the ‘new normal.’

In this era of COVID-19, manufacturers are looking to keep their operations safe but also productive, which can be a tricky mix. But that is where Andonix might be able to help.

The Detroit-based SaaS platform company now offers Safely Pass, a digital tool that can track the likelihood of employees contracting coronavirus in the workplace. This is achieved through the monitoring of social distancing, physical touch points and other aspects.

The tool comes at no cost. “We want to help as many companies we can go back to work,” Andonix CEO and founder David Yanez declares. “Our solution basically allows companies to digitize wellness monitoring.”

Doing it Safely

One area where Safely Pass can help is at manufacturers’ entrances. “Companies are implementing health monitors at different gates,” Yanez says, explaining that some of these firms ask their employees to fill out wellness forms on paper.

But Safely Pass can automate this process by allowing employees to submit the forms via their phones. This allows for digital records to be kept in real time, as well as touch points to be reduced.

Safely Pass also allows users to look at rooms in their workplace and see if they are any crowded areas that they want to avoid. With the help of heat maps, “We can show you on your phone [that] the cafeteria has more people,” Yanez states. “So you can say, ‘This is crowded, so I will avoid going there.’”

Tremendous Traction

Dana Corp. — a provider of power train components for OEMs and automobile manufacturers — recently implemented Safely Pass. “[Their] plant was declared essential in Mexico because they’re providing parts to the transportation industry,” Yanez describes.

In addition, firms such as Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and Master Electronics are using the app. “We’re getting tremendous traction to get this implemented,” he says.

Some companies do not allow their employees to bring their phones into the workplace, but that has not stopped Andonix from working with them. Instead, “We’re looking to provide them with other methods of detection,” Yanez says.

These include solutions that will allow companies to see if their workers are not wearing face masks and whether they are properly distancing themselves from each other. “We can see [if] people are getting too close,” he states.

Ready to Adapt

In the past, Yanez says, manufacturers have been slow to adopt digital tools. But once the Trump administration declared a pandemic, the industry saw increased demand. “This is now forcing companies to [move] more quickly,” he says. “It’s not a choice if you want to stay open and adapt to the new normal.”

Andonix plans to continue helping companies as they adjust. “If we go back to work without the minimal detection and monitoring, we’re going to go back to square one,” Yanez says. “I think the future is making sure that we get this done right.”

Related Stories